IT Education Demographics and Trends in 2022

IT Education Demographics and Trends in 2022

1. Introduction to the IT Education Demographics and Trends

The IT industry is changing rapidly and some of the key trends that you need to be aware of are in the spotlight right now. The way IT education and training is evolving, which institutions are leading the way, and which trends will continue to shape the future of IT education.

Change that depends on organizations

There’s a lot of change happening in the IT education industry, especially if you want to understand where things are going and how it might affect you. There are some trends that will inevitably drive change for years to come, like mobility and cloud computing through 2020. And then there’s an important development that can affect your organization for the next two years at most (like digital literacy, data security, and cybersecurity), but won’t have an impact on your business for another 5 years (like cloud-native computing).

In this post, we explore some of those topics: how organizations want their employees to learn nowadays; what technology they want employees to use; what people they want their employees to be; where they think they will work 3-5 years from today; what types of skills they think their employees need or expect; who these people are currently using technology within their organizations; where these people expect to go next. Together, this information helps you make sense of what’s happening in tech education today — as well as how it might all play out over the next few decades.

2. Learning Analytics and its Role in IT Education

Learning Analytics (LA) is one of the buzziest topics around the new IT education business. AI, machine learning, and deep learning are all hot topics in education, so it’s no surprise that the terms “learning analytics” and “machine learning” are mentioned quite a bit in conversations about how to define, measure, and analyze different aspects of IT education. This also has implications for how IT education is delivered across schools and universities, meaning that there are more opportunities to learn from each other and more data-driven insights to share with educators.

We will attempt to bring you a somewhat more unbiased perspective on this topic by driving back into our own data and presenting what we know today about school enrollment trends among K-12 students, as well as how LA can help them get the right information they need right when they need it.

3. IT Education Demographics, 2022

Last year we examined the IT education demographics and trends in the US. We now turn our attention to a few international countries, especially those where we have data to look at.

The United Kingdom is one of the most interesting markets for us to consider, given that it is a mature market with a large amount of experience behind it. It’s also an important one for several reasons:

1. It has the largest amounts of data that we have available about education: roughly 2 out of 5 students are considered to be “attending” or “undergoing” formal IT education in UK universities.

2. It’s not exactly a market where there are many direct competitors (like Germany, Japan, or China). Instead, it has some small players who are all trying to get into the business, but none of them can offer what we can already offer (at least not easily).

3. It is hard to compare UK-based companies with European competitors on price and features — they do offer some features that US companies don’t (for example, Microsoft Office 365), but they don’t offer so many features as US competitors do either (there aren’t too many free features in email or Word.) Some people will use our products and others won’t; some people will use ours and others won’t, and some people will buy ours and others won’t. But more importantly, UK-based companies should be able to sell their products very successfully without having to compete directly with each other — which makes their success very important for us as well!

The following post provides three charts showing how things change over time from this past year:

1) How female students changed from 2016-2017 in terms of their gender distribution by student group: male-dominated groupings became substantially more female than they were earlier on…

2) How male students changed from 2016-to 2017 in terms of their gender distribution by class: males tended towards being more “senior citizens” than they were in earlier years…

3) How female students changed from 2016-to 2017 in terms of how much tuition fees were charged per term: increases were most pronounced for senior citizens… What are you doing? Did you read this post? Did you find this useful? What was your favorite part? Did you learn something new about your company or product? Please feel free to comment below!

4. The Future of IT Education

Industry analyst and author Ryan Holmes (one of the best writers I’ve come across) has put together some statistics on what will be the demographics and trends in IT education in 2022.

He breaks it down into three sections: “Teaching to the test”, “Teaching to revenue”, “Teaching to revenue with profit”.

While there have been massive changes in technology over the past decade and a half, there are still large groups of people who do not have access to the latest tech tools, such as low-income populations. There will be students who rely heavily on their parents or family members. There will also be those who choose not to work because they don’t want a traditional job; for example, self-employed independent contractors.

5. Conclusion

In the year 2022, it will be very hard to get a bright and young IT person to work in an organization. The biggest, boldest challenge for organizations looking to hire is finding people who are not too old (maybe 40) and not too young (maybe 20). And so, we’ll have to rethink how we recruit:

In the year 2022, it will be very hard to get a bright and young IT person to work in an organization. The biggest, boldest challenge for organizations looking to hire is finding people who are not too old (maybe 40) and not too young (maybe 20).

Will the IT industry remain dominated by older people? Many of us think this question is one that can only be answered by studying demographics. But after examining data from the World Bank’s most recent Worldwide Development Report, I found that there are some disturbing trends emerging.

The report describes a positive trend towards younger workers: “The total number of workers under age 25 has risen from 7 million in 2010 to 12 million by 2030.” It also describes some negative trends: “There has been a decline in participation among women since 2000.” Governments everywhere are keen on increasing their youth employment rates, but this has only been partially successful. We do know that India, the world’s largest democracy, faces a very high youth unemployment rate of 38%.

Will the IT industry remain dominated by older people? Many of us think this question is one that can only be answered by studying demographics. But after examining data from the World Bank’s most recent Worldwide Development Report, I found that there are some disturbing trends emerging.

The report describes a positive trend towards younger workers: “The total number of workers under age 25 has risen from 7 million in 2010 to 12 million by 2030.” It also describes some negative trends: “There has been a decline in participation among women since 2000.” Governments everywhere are keen on increasing their youth employment rates, but this has only been partially successful. We do know that India, the world’s largest democracy, faces a very high youth unemployment rate of 38%.

Many people have asked me whether there is any way around this problem — perhaps hiring more women or more service providers (who don’t need much job experience). But I look at it another way: if we want our students to go out into technology then they need training; but with fewer jobs available than existing openings, how will they get training? They’ll need school.

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