What is informal Education in 2022?

What is informal Education in 2022?

1. Intro

We are the teacher. We are the preserver.

So, if you want to know what informal education will be like in 2022, here are a few questions we’d ask:

1) Who will teach it?

2) Who will learn from it?

3) Who will teach others to learn from it?

4) Where will it be taught?

5) How will it be taught?

2. Informal Education in 2022

Many of us here have been inspired to write about education from a certain angle: from the point of view of a kid who comes to school and gets her way, not to mention the many other facets of education. But there is also another angle that has been ignored for far too long:

The growth and democratization of formal education in this country have been astronomical. It’s been widely celebrated as a great achievement, but what is neglected is the fact that it has already happened, and that it will continue to happen even more.

And yet — given how much formal education there is out there today, and given how bad it can be — I think we should all be working harder than ever today to keep up with its development. The world doesn’t stand still anymore; formal education must be considered part of our lives as well if we want our children to grow up in an educational system that works for them rather than against them.

3. Challenges of Informal Education

Interesting discussion on the future of education and the role of informal education in it, from Andrew Ng/Udacity CEO.

Andrew says that the biggest challenges for formal education are:

1. Collecting data about students and teachers;

2. Getting students to take the test on time;

3. Getting teachers to use those tests;

4. Getting students to take tests at the right time (e.g., for non-testing times)

5. Getting students to understand what they’re learning (e.g., expand their minds)

4. Opportunities for Informal Education

Informal education refers to a wide range of activities and practices that are neither formal nor tightly regulated.

Often characterized as informal, informal education is not just about the absence of government regulation. It entails many elements that can be found in formal education, but not in all sectors of the economy.

Informal education is a significant source of talent in diverse sectors across the world:

• It is an appropriate source for training professionals who are needed by their own or industry peers

• It is an effective source for training students and graduates

• It has the potential to contribute to economic development and social well-being

– It’s also a source of employment for people who are unemployed or underemployed – It contributes to human happiness and well-being – It’s also a source of employment for people who are unemployed or underemployed – It contributes to human happiness and well-being – It’s also a source of employment for people who are unemployed or underemployed – It contributes to human happiness and well-being – It’s also a source of employment for people who are unemployed or underemployed – it contributes to human happiness and well-being

The Teach For All movement (TFA) brings together groups from different countries that share a common focus on expanding access to formal education, especially through mobile learning platforms. TFAs have established educational models that encourage students from rural areas, farmers’ markets, military bases, etc.

To participate in formal educational programs. This has been achieved using mobile learning platforms such as TFAO (Towards Formal Education), FBAO (For Basics All Over), and OBAO (Opportunities Beyond Basic). These platforms provide opportunities both at home and abroad through collaborative connections with international organizations like UNICEF.

TFAs share principles in their work such as achieving equity at home by providing opportunities outside formal schooling; investing in indigenous projects; building local capacities; sharing know-how; engaging youth with local industries; ensuring sustainable management. They believe that if we can create more equitable opportunities by providing incentives for people who have the skills but lack these skills at home or abroad then this could help advance global development goals such as reducing poverty globally while stimulating growth locally. TFAs have established educational models that encourage students from rural areas, farmers markets, military bases, etc..to participate in formal educational programs.

5. Conclusion

In the age of social media and meta-knowledge, many new technologies have come to define the way we learn and represent knowledge, including:

1. What is informal education in 2022?

2. What are the new technologies that will be driving this change?

3. How do we define informal education in 2022?

4. How do we design for these new technologies?

5. What does it mean for our students and for us as teachers to work with these new technologies?

We will be revisiting this topic later on, but want to offer a few thoughts around it now:

1. Informal education is a very broad topic — like learning; we might not all agree on what it means or how it behaves — but let’s start with some definitions:

a) Informal education is all learning that takes place outside of formal education, such as home-schooled students, community programs, etc., as well as in-class instruction that includes face-to-face interaction with teachers, peers, or elders (e.g., via tutoring sessions).  Note that ‘informal’ isn’t necessarily different from ‘social’ either; however, the term ‘informal’ implies a more personal or informal relationship than ‘social’.  

In fact, “informal education” can sometimes refer to schooling without any formality whatsoever (e.g., in a neighborhood school), while other times referring to “socialized” schools (e.g., public schools).  As such, informal and social are not necessarily mutually exclusive terms — but rather imply two different views of what the same thing means.  As such, this has been defined by many from different perspectives and perspectives may find different definitions altogether (e.g., formal vs non-formal vs somehow communal).  

So far there seems to be no consensus about how we should apply the term formally or non-formally; however there have been attempts at defining non-formally as something somewhat distinct from informally [i] ; [ii] ; [iii] ; [iv] ; [v].  But let’s start with some definitions anyway: Informally means teacher-student interaction where additional forms of support or participation aren’t required by students themselves (e.g., home tutoring sessions); Formally refers to an educational institution built around having students write papers due weekly/monthly/quarterly.

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